Monday Link Round Up: July 15, 2019

Monday Link Round Up: July 15, 2019

News and music to start your week! In case you missed it, don’t miss reading Megan Lavengood’s excellent piece on gender and hiring as it relates to the field of Music Theory Andrew Clements reviews the new recording by Isata Kanneh-Mason (pictured) of piano works by Clara Schumann.  Read on at The Guardian. Also at The Guardian, read a review of the Cheltenham music festival’s performance of new works by Judith Weir, Dani Howard, and Thea Musgrave. Read the call that Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra is making to other ensembles to hire more disabled musicians and to make inclusion central to…

Monday Link Round Up: July 8, 2019

Monday Link Round Up: July 8, 2019

News and music to start your week! Congratulations to Akiko Fujimoto (pictured above), the first woman to be named Artistic Director of the Mid-Texas Symphony.  Last season the ensemble had a public audition process to find the new director, with four finalists each leading a concert.  Fujimoto was a somewhat familiar face as she was associate conductor for the San Antonio Symphony from 2012-2017.  Read on here. We are happy to unveil (drum-roll, please!): our newly updated database of 500 (plus) Operas by Women! It has been a popular page on our website, but has needed expanding and updating.  It…

Monday Link Round Up: May 27, 2019

Monday Link Round Up: May 27, 2019

News and music to start your week. As we pause on Memorial Day, here are some works by women composers appropriate for today’s reflection. Joan Tower’s Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman – a play off of Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man – is a brilliant work. Julia Perry’s Stabat Mater is a poignant work, helping us to consider the weight of the day and the sacrifices made. Lili Boulanger’s setting of Pie Jesu is not to be missed. Upcoming concerts! The Orchestra of the League of Composers performs Aurora by Thea Musgrave on June 1. The Bay Area Rainbow…

BBC Proms 2018: By the Numbers

The 2018 BBC Proms kicks off today, Friday, July 13 and continues with extensive programming through September. The annual event features what is considered the best of the best in contemporary classical music programming with ensembles, soloists, and conductors from around the world. The schedule of events is enormous, with paid and free concerts, lectures, workshops, radio broadcasts – not a dull moment until after Labor Day. Others have already shared their thoughts on the choices in programming for this year’s Proms, but we felt it important to add our thoughts, and figures, to the conversation as the Proms officially…