Monday Link Round Up: July 15, 2019

Monday Link Round Up: July 15, 2019

News and music to start your week! In case you missed it, don’t miss reading Megan Lavengood’s excellent piece on gender and hiring as it relates to the field of Music Theory Andrew Clements reviews the new recording by Isata Kanneh-Mason (pictured) of piano works by Clara Schumann.  Read on at The Guardian. Also at The Guardian, read a review of the Cheltenham music festival’s performance of new works by Judith Weir, Dani Howard, and Thea Musgrave. Read the call that Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra is making to other ensembles to hire more disabled musicians and to make inclusion central to…

2015-2016 Season Highlights

The 2015-2016 concert season is now underway for ensembles across the United States – which means it’s also time to take a look at the orchestral repertoire that is being performed. As we wait for the official repertoire reports from the League of American Orchestras (which, unfortunately, will be a while – the last available reports are from the 2010-2011 concert season) we took a look at what some of the most highly regarded ensembles in the United States are performing this year.  (We used the same list of ensembles that the Baltimore Orchestra used for their infographic published last year and followed…

2010-2011 Repertoire Report

While our priority at the moment is to get the word out about our Performance Grants, we thought we might take a moment to reaffirm the need for those grants, by taking a close look at some data about what orchestras are programming.  In our work to level the playing field for works by women, we often turn to the repertoire reports that the League of American Orchestras assembles annually; they provide a summary of the progress that is being made (or not made).  These reports are valuable as they gather data from orchestras throughout the United States.  However, they are also…

The 1.7 Percent: Distilling the 2008-2009 Repertoire Reports

Stories about “the 1%” abound in the media, but today I would like to shine a light on a far less reported, though far more relevant for this site’s purposes, statistic: the 1.7%. Our own Sarah Baer crunched the numbers (provided by the League of American Orchestras) and determined that out of over 12,000 individual performances of orchestral pieces in the US during the 2008-2009 season, only 109 were works by female composers.  Taking into account that ensembles may have performed some of these 109 works more than once, Sarah concluded that (at most) women composers were heard in concert…