Monday Link Round Up: April 15, 2019

Monday Link Round Up: April 15, 2019

News and music to start your week! Sorry to be late with our update, we’re just back from Minneapolis, where huge things are happening at the Minnesota Orchestra with Maestro Sarah Hicks!  A few weeks ago, the hip-hop artist Dessa live-recorded an album with the orchestra, a first for a hip-hop artists and a major symphony to collaborate in this way.  Then just his weekend, April 13, Hicks led the orchestra in Amy Beach’s “Gaelic” Symphony (op. 32), a brilliant performance, and the first by the orchestra of this work in 102 years! Hicks, together with violist and commentator Sam…

Monday Link Round Up: October 31, 2016

News to start your week! In honor of Halloween, take a few minutes to read about Elizabeth Lutyens – an English composer who worked in serialism, but who is perhaps most famous for the dozens of film scores she wrote for horror films!  Read more here.   The New York Times has a conversation with conductor JoAnn Falletta about her work with the Buffalo Philharmonic.  Her achievements with the ensemble – in terms of financial stability, community development, and musical excellence – are to be commended.  Read on here! Anne Midgette of the Washington Post spoke with violinist Hilary Hahn, who appeared in concert…

Grammy Nominations for Anna Clyne and Hilary Hahn

The list of 2015 Grammy nominations has been published – and Anna Clyne’s Prince of Clouds is in the running for Contemporary Classical Composition.  Her work shares the ballot with John Luther Adams (Become Ocean), George Crumb (Voices From The Heartland), Stephen Paulus (Concerto For Two Trumpets & Band), and Roberto Sierra (Sinfonia No. 4). Have a listen to the Chicago Symphony performing the nominated piece: I also recommend listening to this conversation between Clyne and soloist Jennifer Koh about the work:   Also nominated in the Chamber Music/Small Ensemble category is the recording of Hilary Hahn’s “27 Pieces”.  We wrote about this when the project…

The Long, LONG Arc of History

With the debut of Margaret Ruthven Lang’s Dramatic Overture in 1893, the world changed: never before had an orchestral work composed by a woman been performed on the American stage.  The intervening 119 years have brought monumental social change, much of it due to the ever-increasing participation of women in all aspects of society.  But what of women in classical music?  Concerning female composers, it seems accurate to say that change is frustratingly slow.  Can this perception about their long arc of history be clearly spelled out and quantified? Our resident researcher Sarah Baer pored over eight seasons (2000-2008) of…