Monday Link Round Up: March 13, 2017

News to start your week! In line with the conversations that have been taking place in honor of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day, The Guardian has a fantastic op-ed by Susanna Eastburn, head of Scotland’s Sound and Music, about why women are worthy of inclusion.  She argues, it’s not about Tokenism – it’s about Talent.  Read on here   Speaking of International Women’s Day, Alex Ross chose that day to feature Do You Be by Meredith Monk on his blog.   Fanny Mendelssohn’s Easter Sonata for piano, which was lost and then misattributed to her brother, Felix, has finally been premiered under her name!  The…

Honoring Fathers

It can be hard to look past the stories of those composers who faced obstacles in their art at the hands of their own parents.  There are some famous stories – from Germaine Tailleferre, who changed her name to break ties with her father, and Ethel Smyth, who had to battle her dad to be able to study and work in music. However!  Father’s Day weekend is a great time to remember and be thankful for the fathers who supported their daughters, even when it went against social expectations or propriety.  Here are just a few of the many examples…

2015 In Review

This was an exciting year for those of us following women’s work in music.  We’ve already talked a bit about the tremendous opportunities and advancements women have made in conducting roles.  But Let’s also take some time to look at the plethora of “Highlight” lists that have been shared online and see how they compare to our favorite stories and concerts:   Sinfini Music was very deliberate in highlighting the achievements that women have made in the UK in the past year – including the appointment of Xian Zhang, the first woman to have  a titled role at a BBC Orchestra, Jessy…

Francesca Caccini

The life of Francesca Caccini (1587- after 1641) provides another example of a woman fortunate to be born into a family supportive of her musical pursuits. Caccini’s father was an accomplished musician, composer, and educator and gave his daughter every opportunity that she could have hoped for as a young woman period living in Italy in the early Baroque period. Her education and inspiration resulted in her opera La liberzione di Ruggiero, which is largely accepted as the first known opera composed by a woman. For a significant portion of her life, Caccini was in service at the Medici court…