The First Recording of Ethel Smyth’s <em>The Prison</em>

The First Recording of Ethel Smyth’s The Prison

         We welcome our Featured Guest Blogger  Dr. Amy Zigler back to share her recent experience! The Recording of Ethel Smyth’s The Prison by James Blachly and the Experiential Orchestra, with Sarah Brailey, soprano, Dashon Burton, bass-baritone, Steven Fox and the Clarion Choir, and Blanton Alspaugh and Brandon Johnson of Soundmirror. 14-15 February 2019. “…I wanna be in the room where it happens…” - Hamilton, Lin-Manuel Miranda As a historical musicologist, I don’t often have the opportunity to be “in the room where it happens”. But that is the line that popped in my head last week. Few…

CD Review: Ruth Lomon, Shadowing

While we rarely publish CD reviews on our blog, we decided it was important to give coverage to a recent CD by composer Ruth Lomon.  Ruth’s music ranges from expressive and lyrical to electrifyingly engaging.  But not only that, Ruth has always been seriously dedicated to promoting the work of other women composers, through projects such as pioneering work (in the 1970s and 80s) with American Women Composers, Inc. (which in 1995 became part of the IAWM) of researching repertoire and organizing concerts and conferences, to her more recent work of orchestrating the Viola Sonata by Rebecca Clarke (info here,…

Happy Birthday, Dame Ethel Smyth! Celebrating a New Recording

Featured Guest Blogger: Dr. Amy Zigler In celebration of Dame Ethel Smyth’s 159th birthday, we present a detailed review of the first ever recording of Smyth’s opera The Boatswain’s Mate, which was released last fall by Retrospect Opera.  Dr. Amy Zigler is a noted authority on Smyth (and Assistant Professor of Music at Salem College) and we are happy to have her return as a featured guest blogger. Her previous blog, a review of an exciting performance of Smyth’s The Wreckers is here.        Retrospect Opera is dedicated to this essential project: “to allow people to hear great British operas that…

Monday Link Round Up: July 25, 2016

News to start your week! ICYMI, Philip Clark shared his thoughts in The Guardian in a blog post titled “Where have the great composers gone?”  His thesis is, essentially, that contemporary music doesn’t compare to composers like Britten, Tippet, Davies, and Birswistle.  You can read the full piece here.  What’s most important about this piece is the other responses it has solicited. Susanna Eastburn, the chief executive of Sound and Music, “the UK’s leading organization for new music”, shared her response as an op-ed in The Guardian.   Joshua Mosman, of the San Francisco Chronicle also responded.   It is Marin Alsop’s 25th…